Daily Chess Improvement: World Champion’s Endgame!

SusanPolgar

White to move! How should white proceed? Please, no one move answer. Please post out the game plan.

Comments (8)
No. 1-4
Yancey_Ward
Yancey_Ward

Editor

Basically, you can sort of solve this puzzle by counting how many moves it takes black to win the trapped bishop and then get back to defend the black bishop against the white king and the passed e-pawn. It is made more complicated by having to consider what happens if black ever has time to play b4 fixing the backward c-pawn on a light square.

Yancey_Ward
Yancey_Ward

Editor

The stingier defense would have been to not go for the trapped white bishop, this would have held the h-pawn and kept the white king from infiltrating, but then the white bishop overloads the black bishop and picks up either the c-pawn or the f-pawn, or forces the black king back to protect the f-pawn and allows the white king into black's half of the board.

Yancey_Ward
Yancey_Ward

Editor

Like Albi, I had already seen this game (I watched Agadmator's video yesterday covering this game). Of course, the right idea is to go after the h4 pawn with 1.Kf2. This would be a better puzzle if the initial position had been on white's previous move of capturing at a6 allowing black's b5 trapping the bishop and asked if it was ok to capture at a6 given that b5 traps the white bishop.

The point of going after the h-pawn is that white is also threatening to bring the king up the board to support the advance of the e-pawn, thus winning the bishop back or winning the f-pawn and creating connected passed pawns.

Nakamura didn't play the stingiest defense at that point- but it was probably the best one to play in hoping for Carlsen to err. Nakamura accepted the challenge, and captured the bishop with the king, and Carlsen won the h-pawn and the f-pawn, used the time wasted by Nakamura to put the backward c-pawn on a dark square, and then used the two connected passed pawns to win the black c-pawn- all without ever winning the black bishop. Just an amazing endgame calculation by the World Champion. The technique he used in a rapid game was absolutely flawless- not a single error. I could see that white wouldn't lose- the idea was instantly spotted by me while I was watching the video, but I couldn't be sure that it was winning.

albi
albi

It's so sad, unfortunately I watched the game, so Carlsen spoilered the solution.
If I remember correctly white allows black to take the bishop and wins by promoting a pawn.
I would have never ever found the combination by myself.


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